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Finding a job - why so hard?
#1
I have had three interviews for admin roles within the NHS, and have lost out narrowly on the job by two of them. I've had good feedback, but it's a case of you are a nice guy....but....as always.

I don't really want to go down the temping route, as agencies down here are pretty crap. I used to work in local government, but don't fancy it again due to the cuts. Private sector jobs seem to be hard due to the financial uncertainty due to the pandemic and I live in a non-prosperous area where the only jobs are care work or shop work.

Bare in mind, I haven't worked for a long time due to illness and I cared full-time for my late ex. I have done voluntary work for a charity for three years,but that came to an end due to the Corona. 

I'm looking at doing some part-time courses at local college just to help with prospects and meet people. I'm desperate to return to work, as I want to leave the area I am living in.

Any advice please?
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#2
Aware things are a bit different over here in Ireland, but...MAN my priorities have changed over the years, and I've only made sense of that in the last few weeks.

I used to work in call centres within bank (got made redundant when job moved to UK) so stayed in call centre (only this time was involved in marketing.) That got me into marketing and stuff, but...that led to another two redundancies on whims (one of which was while having chemo.) I went into the civil service for job security, but it took two fucking years and half the money than I was used to. Because I'm experienced and know my shit, am doing a decent amount of work, but...I'd like to get back to the world of decent money, please.

However...there's a LOT to be said for job security in the current climate, and glad that I'm safe (he says, jinxing it.)

How long have you been looking, anyway? Last few times I was job-hunting before this role, I was going about 6 months. Maybe getting a reply/interview for 1/20 applications, and getting fuck all feedback on the ones I didn't get.

That's...not going to be much help, but based on your reasons and that, I think you know your headspace and what you kinda want/need out of a job. Good luck! Heart Heart
[+] 1 user Likes ken_85's post
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#3
(27-08-2020, 05:48 PM)ken_85 Wrote: Aware things are a bit different over here in Ireland, but...MAN my priorities have changed over the years, and I've only made sense of that in the last few weeks.

I used to work in call centres within bank (got made redundant when job moved to UK) so stayed in call centre (only this time was involved in marketing.) That got me into marketing and stuff, but...that led to another two redundancies on whims (one of which was while having chemo.) I went into the civil service for job security, but it took two fucking years and half the money than I was used to. Because I'm experienced and know my shit, am doing a decent amount of work, but...I'd like to get back to the world of decent money, please.

However...there's a LOT to be said for job security in the current climate, and glad that I'm safe (he says, jinxing it.)

How long have you been looking, anyway? Last few times I was job-hunting before this role, I was going about 6 months. Maybe getting a reply/interview for 1/20 applications, and getting fuck all feedback on the ones I didn't get.

That's...not going to be much help, but based on your reasons and that, I think you know your headspace and what you kinda want/need out of a job. Good luck! Heart Heart

Sorry to hear you've not had much luck on the job front. I guess it's the same in the majority of countries at the moment with the market. Unfortunate you're on half he money as well, but at least you're in a job.

Since being disrupted by Corona - March. I've had four interviews, all of which have been a no - either I've been beaten by someone with more experience, or in the case of the interview today I lost narrowly.

I'm just tired of where I am living, and once my sister and her youngest move into their home next week, it's back to me just pondering around at home bored out of my skull. I have no friends and all I seem to get is endless phone calls from loved ones just wanting me to solve their problems. I've had two years of this! I'm hoping the college get back to me, as I couldn't upload the documents due to their site playing it up, just so I have purpose in life and something to wake up for as opposed to being jealous others have a social life / relationship or sorting out issues.
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#4
You’ve had a stretch of not working outside the home, so I’m afraid that’s a weak point.  You’ve been a caregiver (for your partner), so that’s a strong point to build on.

Figure out which cities you’d consider moving to, and also figure out what’s the modern day equivalent of placing a classified ad for the gay communities in those cities, and/or the equivalent of pinning your contact info to notice boards there.  Perhaps you know someone you can ask who lives there already?

Anyway, your offer would be simply stated:  “Know someone in need of a caregiver?  A parent?  Someone injured?”  Explain briefly your years of experience as caregiver for your husband.  Communicate that you are a gay man, so there are no surprises.  Say that you are willing to move if accommodations could be worked out.

Of course any agreement you make would have to allow for time-off, days-off, so you can explore for your next goals, already in the city where you want to live.
[+] 1 user Likes jdcyl's post
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#5
(27-08-2020, 08:42 PM)jdcyl Wrote: You’ve had a stretch of not working outside the home, so I’m afraid that’s a weak point.  You’ve been a caregiver (for your partner), so that’s a strong point to build on.

Figure out which cities you’d consider moving to, and also figure out what’s the modern day equivalent of placing a classified ad for the gay communities in those cities, and/or the equivalent of pinning your contact info to notice boards there.  Perhaps you know someone you can ask who lives there already?

Anyway, your offer would be simply stated:  “Know someone in need of a caregiver?  A parent?  Someone injured?”  Explain briefly your years of experience as caregiver for your husband.  Communicate that you are a gay man, so there are no surprises.  Say that you are willing to move if accommodations could be worked out.

Of course any agreement you make would have to allow for time-off, days-off, so you can explore for your next goals, already in the city where you want to live.

I do feel this of working at home has penalised me...yet it wasn't my fault. It's a bit discriminative, but as I said when I had my feedback that I haven't had a proper job for eight years and had to find a very dated example. I wouldn't want to go back to doing caring again, unless it was my own family in dire need, but thank you for the suggestion.
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#6
The point is to (cliche coming...) “think outside the box”.
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#7
(27-08-2020, 06:15 PM)NDN1984 Wrote: Since being disrupted by Corona - March. I've had four interviews, all of which have been a no - either I've been beaten by someone with more experience, or in the case of the interview today I lost narrowly.

You need to also reflect on just why you weren't given the offer.  Jobs don't always go to the applicant with the most experience or best CV.  (I know this because I've been on the hiring side of the table many times.)
Personal factors also come into the picture as well.  (I work in a highly creative field where that is allowed.)
As a hiring manager I would often ask myself if I can work with this person.  The best qualified would not always get the job offer (if the next in line is more likeable and can be brought up to speed in a reasonable amount of time).

You might consider getting interviewing counseling.  I don't know how you would find that for the field in which you are looking to work, but there may be some online (YouTube?) videos that can teach the basics.  How you interview makes a BIG difference.

Rule no. 1:  Be positive (nobody wants to hire someone who projects negativity or unhappiness)

Good luck.
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#8
(27-08-2020, 04:31 PM)NDN1984 Wrote: I have had three interviews for admin roles within the NHS, and have lost out narrowly on the job by two of them. I've had good feedback, but it's a case of you are a nice guy....but....as always.

I don't really want to go down the temping route, as agencies down here are pretty crap. I used to work in local government, but don't fancy it again due to the cuts. Private sector jobs seem to be hard due to the financial uncertainty due to the pandemic and I live in a non-prosperous area where the only jobs are care work or shop work.

Bare in mind, I haven't worked for a long time due to illness and I cared full-time for my late ex. I have done voluntary work for a charity for three years,but that came to an end due to the Corona. 

I'm looking at doing some part-time courses at local college just to help with prospects and meet people. I'm desperate to return to work, as I want to leave the area I am living in.

Any advice please?

I'd definitely go the agency/temping route if starting from scratch.

I'm going back about 10 years now but I took 4 temp office jobs over a couple of years with Office Angels, and for 3 of them I was offered a different or permanent role within the company and didn't even have to interview for any of them - they just tell you to go along somewhere as and when. Office Angels tend to mainly get female applicants I think and being a guy is something that I felt made me stand out from the crowd a bit.

One of them was literally sitting behind a reception desk with zero duties but I couldn't do that, so found things to do and asked everyone for jobs to do, they said no other temp had done that and they offered it me permanently. You just have to shine and show them how amazing you are. I guess being a temp is like a long drawn out interview in a way. It's a great easy way in to professions which you have no experience in and can lead to many other things and I'm still really good friends with someone I met at one of those jobs. Also the money I seem to remember was quite good too.
[+] 1 user Likes Andy's post
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#9
The thing is Andy, the agencies down here really are no use at all. I remember going for a job that was beneath what I was doing before, and was refused because "I'd be suited as a carer or a nurse"! I felt very insulted and felt all the qualifications and years of experience in business administration meant nothing. Nothing against people in those roles, as my oldest sister is a nurse, but it sums up the attitude of these people. Adding to that, a lot of agency roles were very picky as well as in they'd either want people just left school / college or they wanted certain people who fitted their image (those who won't question anything and be challenged or have a conservative approach). I never forget being sent for one interview, where the place was like a modelling agency! This was an office for a computer company, and I remember when I turned up for the interview and when they came to interview me, they were so abrupt with me, because I didn't look good - bare in mind, I was 31/32, a bit overweight, just getting over a bereavement and just "ordinary looking". I'm quite happy with a dad bod thank you very much, but that's for another story.

I've had too many false leads with agencies, and yes maybe in the last few years their attitudes may have shifted and be better run, but they're pretty crap down here.

I've just been accepted on a place for a book-keeping course at the local college, so at least I've got something to get up for now and aim for and then do the other courses.

(28-08-2020, 03:29 AM)Parsifal Wrote:
(27-08-2020, 06:15 PM)NDN1984 Wrote: Since being disrupted by Corona - March. I've had four interviews, all of which have been a no - either I've been beaten by someone with more experience, or in the case of the interview today I lost narrowly.

You need to also reflect on just why you weren't given the offer.  Jobs don't always go to the applicant with the most experience or best CV.  (I know this because I've been on the hiring side of the table many times.)
Personal factors also come into the picture as well.  (I work in a highly creative field where that is allowed.)
As a hiring manager I would often ask myself if I can work with this person.  The best qualified would not always get the job offer (if the next in line is more likeable and can be brought up to speed in a reasonable amount of time).

You might consider getting interviewing counseling.  I don't know how you would find that for the field in which you are looking to work, but there may be some online (YouTube?) videos that can teach the basics.  How you interview makes a BIG difference.

Rule no. 1:  Be positive (nobody wants to hire someone who projects negativity or unhappiness)

Good luck.

I will admit, I do leave a positive impression and in the last two interviews I have had positive feedback saying I was very upbeat, jovial and lovely but beaten by someone with more experience. The problem is, when you have not worked for a while it is hard on some questions to give examples. Yes I have done voluntary work for a charity that helps people with housing and social benefits and I've helped clients get homes and win benefit appeals, but it just seems not to resonate in the wider world. It hurts when I think, in the last eight years I have done something. I did GCSEs in Maths and English at the age of 33 and got high grades. I've stood for political office twice in 2015 and 2019. OK I didn't get elected, but I've done it. I've founded and ran a branch for three years, before an alcoholic, racist, anti-semitic, man-hating white South African woman with child neglect charges ruined it!
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#10
In the white collar world most companies want to hire someone who is currently working (less risk) or someone right out of school (cheap!).  To hire someone who has been out of work for a long time they have to see some real potential, above and beyond. And you have to have a good story as well as good chemistry with the interviewer. You have to stand out.
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#11
This was on the BBC website about creating a CV - LINK

Hope it is of help and good luck in your search  Approve
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#12
Quote:The thing is Andy, the agencies down here really are no use at all. I remember going for a job that was beneath what I was doing before

To be honest, the way you talk about these things is off putting and if even a sliver of that comes through in your applications then it's counting against you. Also (to be blunt) you really can't complain that you're not getting jobs whilst also refusing to go through agencies for temp roles - If you want to keep waiting for the perfect job that's desperate to employ you then you could be waiting a long long time; on the other hand if you get yourself back into the job market and start even with a crappy job you will be earning money, be back on the jobs ladder and be in a position to spot jobs that are more what you want to do within the various companies temp agencies place you with AS WELL AS applying for any other jobs that take your fancy.

As an employer i can tell you a blank spot on a CV is a small red flag, someone then choosing /not/ to take agency work and instead choosing to stay unemployed is a BIG red flag that will count against you in interviews. Even just a couple of months temp work will make you more employable by definition.
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