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Facebook vs Australia
#1
BBC news article

After watching some interviews with random Australians, what surprised me the most was how many rely on Facebook for their news and how some politicians seem to rely on Facebook's warnings about fake news (which are relatively new).

I'm personally not a fan of Facebook but must admit it can be quite useful to keep in touch with people, to play games and to post random memes. I'd never consider it a source of news.
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[+] 1 user Likes Tiuri's post
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#2
Yes. Why would you consider it your go-to portal, especially for news?? Why not go direct to a news(paper/tv channel) site instead??

One of the reasons I quit Facebook (apart from security considerations, constant memes (neither funny, nor creative)), but the toxic drip-drip of news-related content (alongside conspiracy theories and other bullshit) makes it more and more similar to Twitter.

Nearly everyone, including gays, seem to want to post their own slant on news topics and social issues. That’s certainly not why I want to visit other people’s social media.

There is a partial issue about why the Aussies want the web giants to pay for hosted news content. But that feels a bit protectionist really - so they can protect their homegrown media. Why should the Government get away with that?? If an industry can’t stand on its own two feet, it falls. Even if it provides a socially useful service.
[+] 1 user Likes jumbler's post
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#3
Yes I was taken back as to how many people use it as a source for news! Australia says it's not going to be bullied and suspect some other countries may follow.
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#4
I can only agree. The whole situation is puzzling.

Australia: If you use news, you must pay for it.
Facebook: OK, we won't use it.
Australia: This is unacceptable.

It's quite possible to believe that Facebook screwed up and blocked more sites than it intended to.

If I needed information about the Australian fire service I would certainly not turn to Facebook.

If the Australian government considers Facebook important for distributing news about the pandemic, it might consider that forcing Facebook to pay for it is not perhaps the best way to achieve this.

(19-02-2021, 09:34 AM)romeolover Wrote: Australia says it's not going to be bullied and suspect some other countries may follow.

Hmmm. Australia could be seen to be the bully, the bully who doesn't like being stood up to.

Facebook surely has right to withdraw from a country if it feels that it can't operate there profitably.

The  problem is that Google and Facebook have hoovered up all the advertising revenue. Their use of news is not really the issue, and and for Google searches involving news may well be less profitable than others. After all, if I search for information about a certain brand of mobile phone, there is a good chance that I will click through to an ad offering to sell me one. I don't think that this is true when I search for news about Iran — though Yahoo will certainly offer me the chance to buy Iran at low prices from Amazon.

Perhaps the answer is to introduce an advertising tax and use that to subsidize news media.

(19-02-2021, 06:11 AM)jumbler Wrote: One of the reasons I quit Facebook (apart from security considerations, constant memes (neither funny, nor creative)), but the toxic drip-drip of news-related content (alongside conspiracy theories and other bullshit) makes it more and more similar to Twitter.

Doesn't this depend on who or what you follow?

(19-02-2021, 06:11 AM)jumbler Wrote: Nearly everyone, including gays …

Why should who you like to shag make any difference? I was an "amateur Kreminologist", now very interested in geopolitics. I don't see why the fact that I like to suck dick should make that somehow unusual. My Facebook posts rarely relate to my sexuality. There are other things.

"You know those gays — only interested in one thing!'
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#5
Ditto

Although I saw something.. dunno if true.. that said they'd suspended all news feeds, so sites like charity sites all lost their 'news feed' where they kept people informed about what they were up to. Thats shit if true.

But as for general world and national news... big fucking deal. Its not like there's nowhere else on the web to access news.
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#6
Wouldn't rely on Facebook for anything. Quit it a few years ago.
[+] 1 user Likes Vic's post
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#7
(19-02-2021, 11:48 AM)Vic Wrote: Wouldn't rely on Facebook for anything. Quit it a few years ago.

Good for you, but so what?

I was discussing the threat to our pubs because of the pandemic in another place. "I haven't been to a pub in 25 years." Great! And what?

It's the same with people who proudly say that they don't go to gay bars and clubs. So what? Many of us do. The fate of these places matters to us.

(19-02-2021, 10:25 AM)ladsnet Wrote: Ditto

Although I saw something.. dunno if true.. that said they'd suspended all news feeds, so sites like charity sites all lost their 'news feed' where they kept people informed about what they were up to. Thats shit if true.

But as for general world and national news... big fucking deal. Its not like there's nowhere else on the web to access news.

I think that they acted in haste and so screwed up. And someone told me that "apparently the proposed Australian law is rather vague about the definition of 'news'."
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#8
Given the (puts on Red cap) capitalist society most of us live in, the whole thing will be resolved by market forces, surely? Does the Australian government value Facebook's "news" service enough to back down on protectionism or will Facebook buckle if they lose hits (& ad revenue)?

The real test will come if other governments around the world copy the Aussie model and Facebook starts getting squeezed out. Many western leaders are under increased pressure from so-called traditional news sources to slap some form of tax on Facebook & others to level the playing field. It's one of Murdoch's hobby-horses,  Poke
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#9
News from Facebook? Huh
It should be no surprise that elections go the way they do. Loon
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