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Brexit
(28-12-2020, 04:06 PM)ladsnet Wrote: Do Americans even know/talk about the 'special relationship'

No

That's just one of the numerous manipulative phrases along with
"American exceptionalism"
"Shining City"
"Free Market"
"Leader of the Free World"
etc.
to keep the system rigged.
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As I see it, "special relationship" comes down to "whatever the US government can figure out how to get the UK to do" when the US needs or wants something, utilizing schmaltzy language that sounds nice, but is often nothing more than utter crap. I'm American, remember. Smile
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I know, funny that isn’t it??

We should send the Americans a bill for all those listening bases they like to keep over here. We’re independent now, aren’t we??

Oh sorry, forgot, there’s another supranational organisation we’re still part of.
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(29-12-2020, 11:10 PM)jumbler Wrote: I know, funny that isn’t it??

We should send the Americans a bill for all those listening bases they like to keep over here. We’re independent now, aren’t we??

Oh sorry, forgot, there’s another supranational organisation we’re still part of.

Are you honestly in favour of the UK quitting NATO???
minimalist sig
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He's a russian stooge !!!!!!


The right wing ERG part of the Conservatives yesterday approved their backing for the deal.
Many suspect this is so it will go through and then in January they'll start finding bits of it they don't like (FISH) and start badgering BoJo to break the agreement and try to renegotiate.

So even after Brexit, the EU arguing will go on and on and on and..
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(30-12-2020, 12:45 PM)ladsnet Wrote: He's a russian stooge !!!!!!


The right wing ERG part of the Conservatives yesterday approved their backing for the deal.
Many suspect this is so it will go through and then in January they'll start finding bits of it they don't like (FISH) and start badgering BoJo to break the agreement and try to renegotiate.

So even after Brexit, the EU arguing will go on and on and on and..

It won't be over until we rejoin in about 20 years time, the majority by then having come to their senses
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(30-12-2020, 07:54 AM)Tiuri Wrote:
(29-12-2020, 11:10 PM)jumbler Wrote: I know, funny that isn’t it??

We should send the Americans a bill for all those listening bases they like to keep over here. We’re independent now, aren’t we??

Oh sorry, forgot, there’s another supranational organisation we’re still part of.
Are you honestly in favour of the UK quitting NATO???
Not directly, but it is a very fair question to ask.

A huge, a massive amount of attention was directed towards the UK’s EU membership fees, as if it was something out of this world (we’ve overspent that 25 times over due to the COVID response, as I pointed out earlier).

NATO is very expensive. But we have no idea by how much.

What we do know is that if the American military decided they needed to mount an operation, and move divisions to the UK, we would have to accommodate and feed them.

And provide whatever facilities they needed. Even if it meant demolishing houses and other property to do so. They could even ask us to provide military hospitals, and we would have to do so at taxpayers’s expense.

It’s in the Home Nation Support Agreement, which was signed in 1973.

Luckily, we haven’t had any “hot” military conflicts in Western Europe since then to put that to the test.

(30-12-2020, 12:45 PM)ladsnet Wrote: He's a russian stooge !!!!!!


The right wing ERG part of the Conservatives yesterday approved their backing for the deal.
Many suspect this is so it will go through and then in January they'll start finding bits of it they don't like (FISH) and start badgering BoJo to break the agreement and try to renegotiate.

So even after Brexit, the EU arguing will go on and on and on and..
With only two loonies abstaining (rather than voting against), I doubt it. They know they’ve won the argument, and if they keep banging on about it, they’ll just lose it again.

The main opposition is likely to come from the DUP, and other hardline unionists.
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(31-12-2020, 01:59 AM)jumbler Wrote: NATO is very expensive. But we have no idea by how much.

What we do know is that if the American military decided they needed to mount an operation, and move divisions to the UK, we would have to accommodate and feed them.

And provide whatever facilities they needed. Even if it meant demolishing houses and other property to do so. They could even ask us to provide military hospitals, and we would have to do so at taxpayers’s expense.

It’s in the Home Nation Support Agreement, which was signed in 1973.

Luckily, we haven’t had any “hot” military conflicts in Western Europe since then to put that to the test.
Oh please. The US miilitary already has several bases in the UK, with more than enough space for enlargement of operations in the case of modern warfare - ie logistics and air support. In the event a war required a large build up of manpower in the UK - eg hundreds of thousands of personnel - the war would a) have to be on our doorstep and b) we'd probably be lucky to have the US on our side. In either case the MoD has disused land larger than the entirety of Nottinghamshire it could call upon - not including disused bases and the like.

Let's be serious though, the EU (and NATO) objections were never really about money, they were about "sovereignty", they were about petty xenophobia and a convenient scapegoat to cover up for politlcal failings for decades.
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Quite. It used to rattle many people (myself included), that the Brexiteers’ position never had to be tested rigorously.

They’ve just succeeded in dragging us back to the 80s. But let’s continue to look forward. Wink
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(31-12-2020, 03:58 AM)jumbler Wrote: Quite. It used to rattle many people (myself included), that the Brexiteers’ position never had to be tested rigorously.

They’ve just succeeded in dragging us back to the 80s. But let’s continue to look forward. Wink

more like to their imagined version of the 50s
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Quote:Boris Johnson's father Stanley is applying for FRENCH citizenship after Brexit

LOL

Superb!
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(31-12-2020, 04:43 PM)ladsnet Wrote:
Quote:Boris Johnson's father Stanley is applying for FRENCH citizenship after Brexit

LOL

Superb!
I know. A bit cake-ist, isn’t it?? LOL

However, let us look at it a bit more carefully.
The Guardian Wrote:His plans to seek a French passport had already been revealed by his daughter Rachel in a book published in March.

She wrote that her grandmother had been born in Versailles and that if her father received French citizenship she too would like to become French.
On the strength of that, Stanley may have a claim to a French passport as he appears to be French by descent. But Rachel is British, not French (you can’t pass on a descent claim more than once). So her chances of getting a passport are nil (unless she moves to France, speaks the language etc etc.).

Can’t really blame Stan, though. The new rules are pretty harsh on people who want to go living in, or randomly travelling across Europe, except for holidays. So getting a passport is the way to go.

It just means there’s a two-tier system - for those who are dual-nationals - and those who aren’t.
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(01-01-2021, 03:13 AM)jumbler Wrote: you can’t pass on a descent claim more than once

It depends on the country.  Citizenship rules are different for every country.

For example, you inherit German citizenship (born outside of Germany) if your father was a German citizen when you were born.  From there on out it's a domino effect until the cycle is broken.  It's different if you were born out of wedlock.
(I understand that German citizenship rules have been relaxed somewhat in recent years.  I forget how.)

Do you know what the rules are for French citizenship? Is it a one-generation benefit or will there be a domino effect there too?  Maybe Rachel can get it too if her father was born a French citizen.
Applying for a passport is not an application for citizenship.  It's a benefit that you can apply for if you are already a citizen.

A friend of mine got her Irish passport (and then lived in Paris) because her grandparents came from Ireland.  She told me that if one of your parents or grandparents was Irish then you can get citizenship too (and thus a passport).
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In Ireland, the law was changed around 35 years ago:
Wikipedia Wrote:In 1986, the 1956 (Irish Nationality and Citizenship) Act was amended by the Irish Nationality and Citizenship Act 1986.

The Act also restricted the open-ended citizenship by descent granted by the 1956 Act by dating the citizenship of third, fourth and subsequent generations of Irish emigrants born abroad, from registration and not from birth. This limited the rights of fourth and subsequent generations to citizenship to those whose parents had been registered before their birth.

The Act provided for a six-month transitional period during which the old rules would still apply. Such was the increase in volume of applications for registration from third, fourth and further generation Irish emigrants, the Irish Nationality and Citizenship Act 1994 was enacted to deal with those individuals who applied for registration within the six-month period but who could not be registered in time.

With regards to German citizenship, it does appear to be partly true - if your parents were born before 2000.
Wikipedia Wrote:A child born in a foreign country no longer receives German citizenship automatically by birth if their German parent was born after 31 December 1999 in a foreign country and has their primary residence there.

Exceptions are:
•The child would be stateless.
•The German parent registers the child's birth within one year of birth to the responsible German agency abroad.

Even in cases where both parents are German citizens, German citizenship does not pass on automatically if both parents were born abroad after 31 December 1999 and have their primary residence outside Germany.
Exceptions are same as the above.
But as a rule, it is just one generation - unless there’s some sort of consular registration route.

In France the situation is this:
Wikipedia Wrote:The child (legitimate or natural) is French if at least one parent is French. Parentage to the parent from whom the French nationality is claimed, must be established while the child is still a minor (under 18).

When the child is born abroad from a French parent, it is essential for the French parent to record the birth of the child in the French civil register. In the event of litigation or to establish definitive proof of French nationality (or request a French passport) French nationality may be established by petitioning for a French nationality certificate from the Tribunal d'Instance (local court) of the person's place of residence, or if residing abroad, via the French Nationality Office in Paris having jurisdiction over French persons residing abroad.

Article 30-3 of the French Civil Code (previously numbered Article 95 of the French nationality code) is a "long-standing bone of contention" in French nationality law that can act as a practical limitation on the number of generations under which French citizenship by descent may be transmitted through births outside France.

Under that provision, a person cannot prove his French citizenship by descent to French authorities when neither that person nor his French parent(s) had, for fifty years, "possession d'état de Français" (contact or links with French authorities, such as a French passport renewal, voting registration, French consular registration, and so on), while residing outside France.

The 1993 legislation did insert a new Article 21-14 into the Civil Code, offering such first and second generation offspring of French emigrants the opportunity to "reclaim French citizenship through simple declaration", if they demonstrate military, "cultural, professional, economic, or family connections with France".
He’d better have all the paperwork handy. Wink I find cases like these at work fascinating, even if they’re quite rare.
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Well, well, well...is anybody surprised by this?

Boris Johnson’s ‘tariff-free’ deal does not include all goods exported from Britain, it emerges
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Poor Percy Pig Sad
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This just might make crashing the currency at an even lower mark necessary.
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Loving all the people/businesses moaning that they didn't realise they'd have to start submitting import/export paperwork now.

Either thick.. or else believed the 'we can have our cake and eat it' argument (ie: they're thick)
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I think it's well established that the majority of (all?) Leave voters didn't understand what they were voting for.  They'll soon understand.
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(10-01-2021, 11:50 AM)ladsnet Wrote: Loving all the people/businesses moaning that they didn't realise they'd have to start submitting import/export paperwork now.

Either thick.. or else believed the 'we can have our cake and eat it' argument (ie: they're thick)
Sort of agree with that, except it seems like even customs agents (i.e. the experts who are supposed to know what they’re doing) are struggling.

Is it the case that the law has moved on?? Doubt it - you’d still need to do customs declarations for stuff from Australia, Japan and so on.

Probably just a bit out of practice, after nearly 30 years (the single market only began in January 1993, or 31. December 1992, before someone corrects me).

Also, the fact that having one consignment with missing paperwork means the whole lorry load must be rejected. Why not just impound the ‘dodgy’ goods?? At least during the interim period, whilst firms are adjusting.

What does surprise me is that goods that are imported to Ireland (north and south) via the UK are still charged import duty - even if the goods don’t leave the lorry. That doesn’t sit right somehow.

What really made me Rolleyes was when British ex-pats living in France and so on realised that they would have to pay VAT and import duty on their online orders from the UK.

Why not just order the goods locally?? They’d be cheaper then. Wink
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