The favouritemales poll results are in ! Check out the special forum for details ! x

Stay at Home where possible - Wear a Mask - Don't Lick Door Knobs. Or any Knobs x


twitter

support the forums by visiting these sites

support the forums by visiting this site

shortcuts

Gossip
Poofery
Showbiz
Back Page

support the forums by visiting these sites

support the forums by visiting this site

support the forums by visiting this site

support the forums by visiting this site

support the forums by visiting this site

support the forums by visiting this site

support the forums by visiting this site

Brexit
#61
Certainly have government policies that have been better at killing people with covid faster than other EU countries.
Reply
#62
I see this as one of those "correct thing for the wrong reason" situations.
Reply
#63
So what are we thinking is going on now ??


Is Boris really preparing to push us all off a cliff.. or is it just the usual 'drag it out till the last minute then give in to the EU and claim a victory anyway' ?
Reply
#64
But...but...we had an oven-ready Brex...,

Nah, I can't even type it with a straight face. Fuck knows what the dimwitted fool has planned - I suspect even he doesn't know. I pity Ursula von der Leyen having to pretend to hold serious talks with an overgrown schoolboy who still hasn't learned how to comb his hair, Shakes
[+] 1 user Likes Ollie2UK's post
Reply
#65
#FACT - the “oven ready” comment referred to the Withdrawal Agreement, not any trade deal. And he delivered the withdrawal agreement. We know this because we left the EU in January.

The only person who has ever said anything close to there being an “oven ready” trade deal was Barnier, right at the start when he did his little powerpoint presentation stating that UK red lines on sovereignty meant the only deal they could give us was a Canada-type agreement. When we said we’d like one of those please the offer vanished.
[+] 1 user Likes Jonesy97's post
Reply
#66
I read an article today that said the UK government might have to purposely devalue, or even go so far as to purposely crash, the GBP because it would be necessary to stave off even more massive destruction of the UK economy in a hard or no deal Brexit situation. Since, by percentage, the UK has a lot more than many other countries do of its economy in exports. I think it said something like 51 or 53 percent, where the US only has 18 percent and China has only 21 percent. I hadn't thought about it, but they made the point that there are times when a country's currency is too strong for its own good to more easily facilitate an economic recovery or stop a horrendous collapse. I hope the UK economy doesn't fall to dust, but it does track with what a lot of economists were saying about Brexit in the near past.
Reply
#67
(08-12-2020, 06:24 AM)Jonesy97 Wrote: #FACT -  the “oven ready” comment referred to the Withdrawal Agreement, not any trade deal. And he delivered the withdrawal agreement. We know this because we left the EU in January.

The only person who has ever said anything close to there being  an “oven ready” trade deal was Barnier, right at the start when he did his little powerpoint presentation stating that UK red lines on sovereignty meant the only deal they could give us was a Canada-type agreement. When we said we’d like one of those please the offer vanished.

Seems like a very difficult 'the easiest deal in history'.
Unless we're saying they never actually said that either now.  Its all very 1984.


The worrying (?) thing is that this was all Cummings' plan. And now he's fucked off. Taking his planbook with him.  So does anybody know what they're doing now ?
Reply
#68
(08-12-2020, 07:15 AM)Jwb52z Wrote: Since, by percentage, the UK has a lot more than many other countries do of its economy in exports.  I think it said something like 51 or 53 percent, where the US only has 18 percent and China has only 21 percent. 

Which is exactly why Brexit was such a stupid idea in the first place.

We import everything.

So lets make it more difficult to import things!


Giddy
[+] 1 user Likes ladsnet's post
Reply
#69
(08-12-2020, 06:24 AM)Jonesy97 Wrote: #FACT -  the “oven ready” comment referred to the Withdrawal Agreement, not any trade deal. And he delivered the withdrawal agreement. We know this because we left the EU in January.

Yeah, but "oven ready withdrawal agreement" doesn't sound as sexy as "oven ready deal", does it? People would have questioned what the 1st meant, whereas oven ready deal = Brexit in full in the minds of most people. Cummings knew exactly what he was doing and it was sold by Tory politicians & the media as if it was the full package,
Reply
#70
Tourism should pick up with cheap holidays in the UK.
(while jumbler's sunny holidays in Greece will be more costly Sad )
Reply
#71
(08-12-2020, 07:15 AM)Jwb52z Wrote: I read an article today that said the UK government might have to purposely devalue, or even go so far as to purposely crash, the GBP because it would be necessary to stave off even more massive destruction of the UK economy in a hard or no deal Brexit situation.  Since, by percentage, the UK has a lot more than many other countries do of its economy in exports.  I think it said something like 51 or 53 percent, where the US only has 18 percent and China has only 21 percent.  I hadn't thought about it, but they made the point that there are times when a country's currency is too strong for its own good to more easily facilitate an economic recovery or stop a horrendous collapse.  I hope the UK economy doesn't fall to dust, but it does track with what a lot of economists were saying about Brexit in the near past.

We'll have to devalue anyway. On the face of it, making our experts cheaper - BUT the raw materials to make those exports will be more expensive and the cost of food, much of which has to be imported, will rise - there will be shortages as lorries are banked up at customs.
Reply
#72
https://www.theguardian.com/business/202...-in-france

Billionaire Brexiter Sir Jim Ratcliffe has chosen to build the “British” successor to the Land Rover Defender 4x4 in France, rather than Bridgend in Wales

LOL

Who'd have thought.
Reply
#73
I know one person doesn't help much, but when the GBP does get devalued, as Vic says, I will be spending more on things from the UK, as I like lots of things you can't get in the US directly anyway.
Reply
#74
I really wished he had died back in April. Not a tear would I have shed.
Reply
#75
(10-12-2020, 09:41 PM)imb39 Wrote: I really wished he had died back in April. Not a tear would I have shed.

Oof...that's grim, Confused

Wouldn't have made one iota of difference anyway. The Tories have been hellbent on No Deal from the outset - well, those that are in control of the party have at least. If it wasn't Boris it would be Gove or Rees-Mogg or some other chinless wonder,
Reply
#76
But I don’t think Brexit was ever a serious possibility until the unholy Trinity found themselves in government. It just wouldn’t have carried enough weight, or votes, to pass.

It really is a case of the wrong place at the wrong time. And appears that Brits really seem intent on learning this the hard way (not being able to travel easily to Europe/have a holiday home there or take their pet/learn what having tough biosecurity rules really means). And that’s just for starters.

If you work in Europe/for a European company, if you spend more than 3 months in a row (or when you add up all the days you travel there), you just won’t be able to do those any more - unless you get a visa. A lot of our European neighbours have much stricter visa regimes than we do.

And if you do apply for residency in a European country, it’s likely to affect how much tax you pay (including over there), as well as your NHS entitlement and so on.

In fact when you add it all up, apart from the travel time, it won’t be any harder to travel to any non-EU country than an EU one (except Ireland).

You might have a generation of people holidaying in the States, Australia or the Caribbean - or more often than before.
Reply
#77
(11-12-2020, 09:50 PM)jumbler Wrote: And appears that Brits really seem intent on learning this the hard way (not being able to travel easily to Europe/have a holiday home there or take their pet/learn what having tough biosecurity rules really means). And that’s just for starters.
I’m sure there will be lots of noise next year as post COVID travel starts to pick up and people find it harder to have their summer hols.


(11-12-2020, 09:50 PM)jumbler Wrote: If you work in Europe/for a European company, if you spend more than 3 months in a row (or when you add up all the days you travel there), you just won’t be able to do those any more - unless you get a visa.
I work for a large German company and we’ve had loads of info about what we can/can’t do. A lot issued in the last week showing the sudden decline in the expectation of a deal.
Reply
#78
I would be interested to know what that means, in practical terms. But I believe that working in Europe doesn’t exempt you from immigration rules. So you’d probably need to apply for some documentation.

My view is that the government haven’t thrown the towel in as quickly as I was expecting them to, but so much negotiation time has been wasted on the three things (fishing, level playing field, oversight), it’s squeezed time out for discussing the “little things” - things that matter to real people.

Can we guarantee aviation safety and flying slots?? Can we agree to recognise UK pensions, and benefits for European people in the UK?? Can we allow Brits to visit Europe visa-free for 6 months when we’re already allowing them to do that if they visit us??

Or what about allowing UK banks to offer accounts to ex-pats in Europe, and the same in reverse?? Never mind tariffs and quotas, they don’t appear to have been touched on.

In fact, it’s been very hard to tell what sort of progress had been made towards a trade deal at all. I can’t even tell what Boris & Co had been asking for, other than a clone of the Canadian deal. So does that mean more tariffs on agriculture, or car parts, or technology or what??

You can’t measure up what they wanted to get, and compare it with what we’re going to lose.

Of course, having an extension would’ve allowed more time to get things sorted, whether for the little things, or the big three things. But no, that was “unacceptable”... So once again, you’re asking whether Brexiteers were serious about negotiating or not, and “no deal” was actually their long-term goal.
Reply
#79
I'm still convinced we will throw in the towel at the last minute, with a lot of bluster to claim we 'won'
Reply
#80
(11-12-2020, 11:21 PM)jumbler Wrote: I would be interested to know what that means, in practical terms. But I believe that working in Europe doesn’t exempt you from immigration rules. So you’d probably need to apply for some documentation.

A lot of it has been about what documentation we may need if there is no deal both in terms of travel but in particular the flow of goods and information. I suspect that a lot of work has been done for some time and the company has been waiting to see what happens but given it’s currently looking like a no deal they’ve decided to issue up it to us.
Reply


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 2 Guest(s)

important

Please read the rules and blacklist BEFORE posting

No porn, fakes, models, leaked sex/nudes, personal ads, spam, petitions or selling on the board. Pictures should be of famous male celebrities over 18.
We reserve the right to ban you from the service if the rules are broken.
No images are hosted on this site. All are hosted on individual members webspace. We do not claim any rights over images posted and assume the poster has permission to do so.
If you believe an image should not be displayed here please contact us to request removal.

By posting on the forums, you agree that you remain solely responsible for the content of your messages, and you agree to indemnify and hold us harmless with respect to any claim based upon transmission of your messages. We reserve the right to reveal your identity (or whatever information we know about you) in the event of a complaint or legal action arising from any message posted by you.

links

famousmalesfamousmales.com
twitter@famousmales
facebookfamousmales
instagram@famousmales_com
britishmade in the UK

 

contactcontact us
teamthe staff
cybersocket